Category Archives: Articles

The Language of Trump & Kim

Reading what Trump and Kim each said about their meeting, it occurred to me that they were using typical LAB Profile® Trigger Language.

Trump uses Toward language and Kim uses Away From language.
Take a look for yourself, from the New York Times:

“I feel really great,” Mr. Trump said. “It’s going to be a great discussion and, I think, tremendous success. I think it’s going to be really successful, and I think we will have a terrific relationship. I have no doubt.”

Mr. Kim said: “It was not easy to get here. The past worked as fetters on our limbs, and the old prejudices and practices worked as obstacles on our way forward. But we overcame all of them, and we are here today.

And then later, as the two leaders reconvened with top aides, Mr. Trump declared of the nuclear impasse, “Working together, we will get it taken care of.”

Mr. Kim responded, “There will be challenges ahead, but we will work with Trump.”

Trump mainly uses language indicating what he wants to gain, achieve or get. This is Toward language.
Kim mainly uses language indicating what was a problem, an obstacle or things to be solved/avoided/prevented. This is Away From language.

What this means, as they go forward, is that even when they are talking about the same things, they are each moving in different directions, one trying to get something and the other wanting to prevent something from happening.

Let’s see what happens next.
Please leave your comments below!

How to write a book in under one minute

I was having an inspiring lunch with 2 wonderful people at a Turkish restaurant here in Berlin today and we were discussing projects.  And they mentioned a book that they are working on.

I suggested that there was a short way to write a book and they were intrigued. So they recorded me.

To be clear…. the recording is under one minute, not the book writing! (there is some background noise, but it’s very audible, and who cares? It’s under a minute.)

And these tips may help you start and finish other projects!
Enjoy!

Shelle
ps. Please post your comments below! How could you use these tips in your projects?

Oprah Winfrey’s Speech Analysis

Oprah Winfrey’s riveting speech at the Golden Globe Awards in January 2018 has been analysed by my colleague from the National Speakers Association in the US, Sam Horn. Sam is one of the most creative people I know, author of Tongue Fu and many other works. (See her bio below)

With Sam’s permission, here is her analysis, including links to the speech:

Was the acceptance speech Oprah Winfrey gave at the Golden Globes the BEST 9 minute speech … ever?

Here are my thoughts on why her talk was so masterful and meaningful. I’d love to hear what you think.

1. She showed up to serve. She was there to inspire, not to impress. This was about creating a rising tide raising all involved, not about self-aggrandizement.

2. She spoke naturally and without notes. Oprah invested the effort to memorize her talk so she could connect with her audience and speak from the heart instead of being “in her head” reading a transcript (verbatim) from a teleprompter. This freed her up to be “in the moment” and “in flow” so she could fully focus on giving the speech of a lifetime, the speech she was born to give.

3. Her content was superbly crafted and condensed. I can only imagine the weeks of preparation that went into distilling this message into an “every word matters” momentum that swept us up in its elegance and eloquence. Imagine all the things she wanted to say yet disciplined herselt to edit out.

4. There was no embellishing, no grand-standing. No try-too-hard language that rang false or self-conscious mannerisms that detracted from the message.

5. It had a reveal. Original talks delight us because they introduce something new and meaningful we weren’t aware of before. When Oprah revealed that the investigator assigned to Recy Taylor’s case was none other than … (wait for it) … Rosa Parks, there was an audible “I didn’t know that” gasp from the audience.

6. She started with WHERE. Oprah’s first words were, “In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother’s house in Milwaukee watching Anne Bancroft present the Oscar for best actor at the 36th Academy Awards. She opened the envelope and said five words that literally made history: ‘The winner is Sidney Poitier.’ Up to the stage came the most elegant man I ever remembered. His tie was white, his skin was black—and he was being celebrated. I’d never seen a black man being celebrated like that. I tried many times to explain what a moment like that means to a little girl watching from the cheap seats as my mom came through the door bone tired from cleaning other people’s houses. But … ”

By putting us in the scene of WHERE she was and what it was like watching a black man receive an award, we understood the significance of her (the first black woman) receiving this award. It fleshed out what an incredible full circle Hero Journey story this is. She put us THERE by jumping right into her WHERE.

7. The truth is in the details. Oprah’s specificity of visual details not only helped us see what she was saying, it caused us to conclude she was telling the truth. We don’t believe vague stories. We wonder if the speaker is making them up, and if the speaker is making this up, what else are they making up?

Mark Twain talked about the importance of carefully chosen words: the difference between lightning and lightning bug. She didn’t just watch Sidney Poitier receive his award, she was sitting on the linoleum floor while she did. That one word linoleum made this story real and relatable and viscerally engaged us because we were picturing the linoleum floor of our childhood.

8. She linked historical and current events. She referenced the true story of Recy Taylor to show that brutality has been happening for decades, and then segued into what’s happening now with Recy serving as a metaphor for all people (past and present) who have suffered abuse and have not been heard, seen, recognized or respected.

9. She didn’t call people OUT, she called them UP. Instead of throwing people under the bus and making this about race or gender, (which would only have created further polarizing divisiveness), Oprah’s goal was to bring people together and galvanize us to move forward in cooperation, not conflict.

10. It featured repeatable, retweetable sound-bites and memorable memes that will take her talk viral. Her enduring one-liners “What I know for sure is that speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have.” “Their time is up. Their time is up.” “A new day is on the horizon.” ensure that her message will be shared on social media platforms which means it will reach even more people globally and will remain top-of-mind for a long time. And isn’t that what we want?

11. It was inclusive. She spoke of “phenomenal men who choose to listen” so this was not male-bashing. She expanded the scope of her intended audience by naming diverse industries which increased relevance and the likelihood that people from all walks of life would feel she was talking to them.

She said, “It’s not just a story affecting the entertainment industry. It’s one that transcends any culture, geography, race, religion, politics, or workplace. So I want to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue. They’re the women whose names we’ll never know. They are domestic workers and farm workers.They are working in factories, in restaurants, in academia, engineering, medicine, and science. They’re part of the world of tech and politics and business. They’re our athletes in the Olympics and our soldiers in the military.”

12. She created an emotional crescendo. Just as a symphony increases intensity to lead to a dramatic finale, Oprah ramped up her energy and vocal volume towards the end. Yet it didn’t feel artificial, it felt authentic. Whatever we want our audience to feel, we’ve got to feel first. If we want people to care passionately and feel empowered, we’ve got to model that by speaking with passion and power. We must launch the emotional bandwagon we want people to jump on in the final minute of our talk.

13. It ended on a note of hope.

She closed with, “I’ve interviewed and portrayed people who’ve withstood some of the ugliest things life can throw at you, but the one quality all of them seem to share is an ability to maintain hope for a brighter morning, even during our darkest nights. So I want all the girls watching here, now, to know that a new day is on the horizon! And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say ‘Me too’ again.”

The best talks have book-ends, call-backs and continuity. They repeat and refer back to what was said in the beginning to create a satisfying full-circle experience. Oprah used the words she wanted us to remember and act on in her send-off. She wanted us to believe it’s possible to feel hope when dealing with ugliness, to see a new day in the midst of darkness. So, instead of being subtle about that, she used and imprinted the exact “rally cry” words she wants us to carry forward.

In doing all the above, she delivered what I believe will become this century’s version of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech

What were your take-aways from Oprah’s speech? How did it impact you – as a person – as a leader – as a speaker?

My take-away is that EVERY speaking opportunity matters. There’s no such thing as a throw-away talk. If we’re receiving an award, participating on a panel, presenting a keynote or giving a report at a staff, board or annual meeting; we have a responsibility to honor the occasion and say something that matters.

We CAN make an enduring difference (even in a few minutes) if we invest the time and effort to craft a meaningful message – and if we put our mind to it.

The @YouTube clip of Oprah’s speech is at this link – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fN5HV79_8B8

About Sam Horn

Sam Horn, CEO of Intrigue Agency, helps people create quality books, businesses, presentation that add value for all involved. Her books – POP!, Tongue Fu! and Got Your Attention – have been featured in New York Times, Forbes, Fast Company and presented to Boeing, Capital One, Intel, Cisco and National Geographic. For more articles and to watch her TEDx talk – visit www.SamHorn.com

Thanks so much Sam!

Please add your comments below.

 

Achieve goals using your own success strategies

Happy new year to you! I wish you all the best!

Here are some quick tips to help you have a successful 2017,
based on your own success strategies!

Find out what your unconscious mind already knows.

If you like what’s in this video, check out my mini e-book,
Wishing, Wanting and Achieving, only $9.99
Read transcript.

Why this probably isn’t the end of the world as we know it.

If you are getting the news, hanging out on Facebook, or just having conversations about current events you’ve probably noticed that the tone has changed dramatically. Depending on one’s point of view, people seem to be elated, panicked or have gone into hiding as a result of the 2016 US elections. There is a lot of shouting going on.

Protests in the US went on for days after the election. Many of my friends on Facebook are predicting dire consequences of a Trump Presidency. Media from around the world has been alternately between blaming Clinton campaign strategy, the FBI director, third party candidates for this election result and engaging in hand-wringing or panic-based predictions.
As I’ve been in Berlin for a little while, I caught the cover of Der Spiegel, Germany’s weekly news magazine with the title: spiegel-trump

The End of the World as We Know it” from R.E.M.’s famous song.
(Transparency alert: I would never have voted for Donald Trump and have been an ardent Hillary support, but I’m Canadian and British, so it is irrelevant.)
BTW for a completely different explanation of the result,
check out my niece Jessica Rose’s piece posted on the Berkeley School of Law Blog.

I think we all need to chill out and accept the result of the US election. Why? Because it is just possible that this is not actually the end of the world as we know it.

These events have been going on right when I am in the middle of
putting myself through Byron Katie’s self-inquiry process.

And if there is one thing I am learning about from this psychological cleansing process,
it’s that whatever is happening,
IS the current reality
and that
we make ourselves miserable by thinking
about what should have happened instead
,
bemoaning the lamentable current state of affairs,
and whining about how we want it to be – but it isn’t.

These are hard lessons to learn. Many people really believe that this result shouldn’t have happened. Maybe they are right – but it’s irrelevant. It did happen.

Here are some of Byron Katie’s inquiry questions
that force us to face reality as it is,
instead of suffering because of our thoughts and beliefs about it.

So if you’ve been thinking as I did:

“This is a terrible outcome for planet earth in general and the good American people specifically,”

Byron Katie would ask: “How do you react when you have that thought?”
I feel worried, anxious, and stressed out about all the terrible things that could result from a Trump presidency – naturally.

Then she would ask: “Who would you be without this thought?”
I would be more relaxed and able to see all the positive events that are happening in the world to make it a better place, and not only the events that I believe are depressing.

I’d be able to remember great things that are happening such as:
– advances in our understandings of how people function and what they need to be fulfilled,
– people who have been isolated from the world, getting access to broad band internet, enabling them to connect, earn a living and more fully participate,
– women more fully taking leadership roles in key corporate and government positions,
– greater awareness of how our habits affect the environment and what we can do about it
– being able to keep in touch with people I love all over the world, whenever I want.

Once I got to this place – one of being able to see what else of a more positive nature is going on in the world – I suddenly realized that when I was participating in the growing awfulizing, I was completely denigrating the capacity of people to be creative, resilient and forward-thinking.

Now that I think about it, this planet has more potential than problems. Every time one of us makes a real connection with another, we improve something. When we communicate online to many, we have the possibility of making a positive difference.

As the late Canadian politician Jack Layton said in his last letter to Canadians:

“My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear.
Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic.
And we’ll change the world.”

We can do this!

The Language of the First Debate

What is really behind the candidates’ statements in the first US Presidential debate of 2016? While analyses have been made about who won, who fell into the other’s trap etc., I was curious clinton-trump-1st-debateabout who was using which Motivation Triggers™ and how effective they were. Were they able to use words that change minds, and if so who’s?

Motivation Triggers™ describe what motivates people, how they think, how they make decisions and how they act. They show up, hidden inside the words people use, and in their behaviour.

Here are the Motivation Triggers™ that our patented software, Libretta®, scientifically measures:

Toward Motivation Trigger™

People who have a Toward Motivation Trigger™ need a goal to be motivated. They want to achieve something and focus on where they are heading.

Away From Motivation Trigger™

When people have an Away From Motivation Trigger™, they easily notice what is wrong or should be prevented and avoided. They are motivated to get away from the things that bother them.

Internal Motivation Trigger™

People who have an Internal Motivation Trigger™ decide for themselves, based on what is important to them. They tend to reject ideas when told what to do.

External Motivation Trigger™

People who have an External Motivation Trigger™ are motivated when they are appreciated, recognized and get feedback. When making decisions they are influenced by outside people or information.

Options Motivation Trigger™

People who have an Options Motivation Trigger™ love having lots of choices and alternatives. They start things and often then start another something else, instead of completing the first activity.

Procedures Motivation Trigger™

People who have a Procedures Motivation Trigger™ prefer to follow a step by step process and often believe there is a “right” way to do things. Without a procedure they may get stuck. When they start something, they are driven to finish it.

Using the transcript from the first presidential debate in 2016 I ran each candidate’s statements, topic by topic through the Libretta® analysis.

Donald Trump used mainly Away From language when he spoke about the following topics:
the economy, trade deals, government regulations and cutting taxes. He recognizes what the issues are without focusing on solutions or goals to be met.

When talking about jobs he uses Toward language mentioning that he wants to “create tremendous jobs”, but this is a relatively rare use of Toward language compared to the number of times he used Away From and Internal language.

This indicates that he is much more concerned with problems, things he does not like and the strategies that he does not approve of. The language he uses resonates with people who are angry and upset about unemployment, and economic disparity. They respond well to someone who matches their level of anger and frustration, which Donald Trump clearly does.

Hillary Clinton, in her opening statement used more Toward and Internal language, talking about what she wanted to achieve and the goals she thought were important.

When criticizing Donald Trump, she used Away From and internal language fairly consistently and, particularly when she attacked his attitudes actions and behaviors. Her main Motivation Trigger™ was Internal – speaking from her point of view about what she thought was important for the country, but not in problem terms (Away From) nor about moving toward goals (Toward).

She finished the evening with Toward and Internal language in her closing statement, again speaking to what would be important for her to achieve during her presidency.

When Hillary Clinton used Away From language it was mostly directed at Donald Trump, and only rarely directed at issues that need to be solved. For her to attract people who respond well to Away From language, she would need to express more of the outrage at the issues that are faced by Americans who have not yet decided to vote for her and talk about how people are suffering.

This is the strategy that Barack Obama used in his “yes we can” speech. With the exception of that tagline the vast majority of his speech was identified to be in away from language.

To attract some of the Donald Trump supporters or the undecided voters, Ms. Clinton might consider switching the direction of her language (she can still say the same messages) from Toward to Away From for these particular audiences. Being selective about the language patterns per audience what would help her attract some of those undecided and some of the weaker Donald Trump supporters.

Let’s see what happens!
Please let me know what you think.
For more information on my Libretta® software: go to www.weongozi.com

 

 

 

How to Sell to Internals

How to Sell to Internals

My coaching client Brenda, the owner of a web design
and google ads management company, had done an analysis of the current web strategy for one of her prospects.Skeptical
She had unearthed valuable information but had
no way to present it
.
And her prospect, also a business owner could be difficult to deal with. Continue reading

How to Avoid Giving Up!

4 Antidotes to letting yourself and others down!Ashamed1

Have you ever noticed that some people keep on succeeding,
while others have great ideas but nothing happens with them in the end?
Do you know people who SAY they will do something and then put it off repeatedly?

Do YOU do this?
But do you know what that seemingly small decision reveals about you?
Firstly, it tells others that you are not trustworthy and cannot be counted on.
Continue reading

Le Quiz du Macho

Le Quiz du Macho – S. Rose Charvet

Êtes-vous macho ? Probablement pas, mais de toute façon, vous pouvez le vérifier pour vous-même, avec ces 10 questions simples. Vous pouvez également montrer ce quiz à vos relations privilégiées.

Le questionnaire

Instructions : Pour chaque proposition, entourez le choix qui correspond le mieux à ce que vous feriez dans cette situation.

1. Quand des personnes importantes pour vous font des suggestions, vous :

a) pouvez remarquer ce qui est erroné dans leur idée.
b) avez une meilleure idée.
c) reconnaissez qu’elle est issue de pensées que vous avez eues précédemment.
d) écoutez et recherchez ce qu’il y a de bon dans cette suggestion.

2. Au travail les gens passent vous voir parce que :
a) vous avez un niveau plus élevé de connaissances et de qualifications.
b) vous savez que ce que vous faites et vous les aidez beaucoup.
c) Vous êtes dans votre rôle de leader.
d) vous faites en sorte qu’ils se sentent appréciés pour leur contribution.

3. Vous vous rappelez d’un moment du passé au cours duquel quelqu’un a critiqué quelque chose que vous avez fait parce que :

a) ils avaient mal compris ou avaient fait une erreur.
b) ils vous rendaient responsable de difficultés pour lesquelles vous n’étiez pour rien.
c) ils ont simplement eu une opinion différente de la votre.
d) ils ont eu besoin de faire un point et de façon valable.

4. Dans votre famille vous :

a) savez généralement ce qui est le meilleur pour elle.
b) ne serez qu’occasionnellement convaincu de changer d’avis une fois que vous avez pris une décision.
c) écoutez ce qu’ils pensent même si vous savez ce qui est exact ou erroné
d) avez appris à écouter et à respecter leur souhait, parfois même lorsque vous êtes en désaccord.

5. Quand vous êtes sûr que quelqu’un a tort, vous :
a) lui faite savoir sans mâcher vos mots.
b) êtes secrètement enchanté et lui faites savoir avec douceur.
c) désapprouvez et attendez ses réponses.
d) questionnez leur point de vue et puis exprimez votre manière de voir les choses.

6. Quand vous faites une erreur :

a) il est si rare que vous fassiez des erreurs et est difficile de retrouver des circonstances ou vous en avez fait.
b) vous détournez souvent l’attention vers autre chose.
c) vous dites plutôt que les autres l’ont ignorée.
d) cela montre simplement que vous n’êtes pas parfait.

7. Quand quelqu’un offre de vous dépanner :

a) vous pensez qu’ils disent que vous ne faites pas un bon travail et rejetez leur offre.
b) vous refusez habituellement parce que vous pouvez le faire mieux par vous-même.
c) vous vous demandez si l’offre n’est pas une critique voilée.
d) quand vous avez besoin d’aide, vous êtes heureux de l’offre et l’acceptez.

8. Quand vous ne savez pas faire quelque chose :

a) vous ne pouvez pas vous rappeler que vous ne savez comment le faire.
b) vous poursuivez et trichez pour le faire.
c) vous travaillez à autre chose.
d) vous recherchez la réponse ou demandez à quelqu’un qui sait.

9. Quand quelqu’un vous dit qu’il y a un gros problème avec ce que vous faites :

a) vous explosez et remettez cette personne à sa place.
b) vous lui faites savoir combien elle se trompe.
c) que considérez qu’elle se fait une montagnes à partir de rien et qu’il n’y pas de quoi dramatiser.
d) vous écoutez pour découvrir ce qu’il considère comme inexact.

10. Quand vous découvrez quelque chose que personne d’autre ne sait :

a) vous faites savoir à chacun que vous savez quelque chose qu’il ne sait pas
b) vous dites avec regret aux autres que vous aimeriez pouvoir leur dire mais que vous ne pouvez pas
c) vous êtes ravi de laissez les autres dans le secret que vous seul connaissez.
d) si c’est un secret que vous gardez pour vous-même et si vous pouvez dire, vous le dites.

Feuille d’interprétation, Quiz du Facteur Macho

Pour chaque a) comptez 4 points, b) 3 points, c) 2 points, d) 1 point.
Si vous avez marqué 14 points ou moins, ajoutez SVP 20 points.

Pour interpréter votre score, voir ci-dessous.
30-40 points = Méga Macho
20-29 points = principalement Macho
15-19 points = Mini Macho
0 à 14 points = Macho Free

Méga Macho : Les autres doivent vous traiter avec des pincettes.Vous cachez probablement une profonde insécurité. Vous avez tendance à saboter votre propre apprentissage en ne recevant pas l’information qui vient de l’extérieur.

Principalement Macho : Vous pouvez être souvent entêté avec les autres, mais pourrez par la suite entendre raison.

Mini macho : De temps en temps vous vous mettez en colère avec certaines personnes, mais le plus souvent vous n’avez pas besoin d’être le plus grand, le meilleur ou le centre de l’attention.

Macho Free: Vous êtes ouvert aux nouvelles idées, même si elles ne sont pas les vôtres et vous êtes disposé à célébrer la créativité et le succès des autres.

Pour vérifier les stratégies de communication, face aux Macho, vous pouvez voir l’article “Le Test du Macho. Voulez-vous en savoir plus sur la communication et l’influence ? Abonnez-vous à la Newsletter irrégulière de Shelle.

© Shelle Rose Charvet : info@successtrategies.com
www.wordsthatchangeminds.com

Shelle Rose CHARVET, d’origine canadienne, est une conférencière internationale et l’auteur du bestseller « Le plein pouvoir des mots » chez Interéditions et disponible en huit langues. Elle est enseignante certifié en PNL, Certified Speaking Professional de la Global Speakers Fédération et Présidente pour 2009 de l’association canadienne de conférencier/ières professionnel(le)s. Elle est connue pour son esprit pratique, son sens de l’humour et son respect profond pour ses interlocuteurs.